Bedtime

I think we might be experiencing a small teenage rebellion. As rebellions go it’s not exactly major. Hunter has decided he’d rather sleep on the couch at night or ideally with me rather than in his crate. It’s my fault of course. To begin with it was just after I let him out for his 3am wee. We get up at 5.30am so I let him as it was only a couple of hours. It then slowly escalated to him starting to whinge about half an hour after he’s gone in his crate for bed usually coinciding with me sitting down. He didn’t even do this as a puppy. I can’t decide whether to put my foot down and keep him in the crate or let him sleep where he wants. I don’t want him to start not wanting to go in the crate during the day. I have tried leaving him out of his crate at night but he’s unsettled until I go to bed so I’m not sure what to do. Any suggestions greatly appreciated :nod:
 

HAH

Moderator
Location
Devon, UK
I’m replying based just on our experience with Kipper; we battled with the crate and made him use it for far too long because we thought we had to. It’s contributed to long lasting stress at bedtime, and I wish we’d been more flexible and gone with what he needed.
If it’s not essential, don’t turn it into a potential conflict or point of stress, particularly if you’re keen he keeps a good relationship with his crate during the day. I suspect he’ll learn to settle pretty quickly once you’ve good a clear routine for bedtime that tells him he doesn’t need to go into the crate. And just a small note that this is great communication! He’s telling you how he feels, you’re listening! Not so much a rebellion and you needing to put your foot down, more a conversation :nod:
 
Thank you @HAH that‘s very interesting. He goes into his crate at bedtime no problem he just doesn’t want to stay in it. Your right I don’t want him to start refusing to go in or not wanting to stay in it at other times. Last night I could see he was making himself stay awake fighting the sleep. He was lying down head up leaning against the side of the crate one eye closed one half close. Every so often he would put his head down for a few minutes then wake himself back up. This went on for about half an hour until he eventually gave up and went to sleep.
 

Cath

MLF Sales Coordinator
Annie still sleeps in her crate with the door open. Fred sleeps on the sofa. I have never made a big thing about it, but don't want them sleeping with

me. Its bad enough with my OH, I wouldn't get any of the bed or duvet if they were there too
 
I’m replying based just on our experience with Kipper; we battled with the crate and made him use it for far too long because we thought we had to. It’s contributed to long lasting stress at bedtime, and I wish we’d been more flexible and gone with what he needed.
If it’s not essential, don’t turn it into a potential conflict or point of stress, particularly if you’re keen he keeps a good relationship with his crate during the day. I suspect he’ll learn to settle pretty quickly once you’ve good a clear routine for bedtime that tells him he doesn’t need to go into the crate. And just a small note that this is great communication! He’s telling you how he feels, you’re listening! Not so much a rebellion and you needing to put your foot down, more a conversation :nod:
Our experience with Homer and his crate was very similar. Bed time begun to be stressful with trying to get him into his crate and then again with trying to get hi. Into the kitchen and close the door.
 
Well I thought I’d solved the sleeping arrangements but over the last few night we’ve gone backwards again. Hunter finds it difficult to settle at bedtime the rest of the day no problem it’s like he fights sleep. The other major difference is in a morning. He used to stay dozing until I was ready to go out now he’s wide awake following me around. I think his teeth are definitely moving the way he’s chewing on things. Anyway I was Googling and came across this article which kind of confirms that it’s most likely age related. I was expecting the teenage phase to be all about ignoring recall and developing selective hearing not wandering about in the middle of the night.:shock:

 
@Jennifer , would Hunter benefit from more mental stimulation in the daytime? And therefore (perhaps) be more ready to sleep come night time.

You mentioned his retrieving is it possible to build on that? Is there anywhere nice (ie +R) near you to go training?

That said I never really enjoyed classes with Cass as an adolescent, they usually involved a long time in various naughty corners! But the lovely set up I go to now wasn't here then, I look at the young dogs coming out of puppy classes and so wish they had been.
 
Found a few more articles confirming discomfort and chewing as adult teeth settle in and changes in sleep patterns at night. As I said before I did suspect it was probably his age but having confirmaTimon from those of you who have been through it and articles written about it helps. :whew: I don’t remember these problems with the previous three but I know they’re all different. They had other issues that’s for sure:wink:
 
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